Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/excell/public_html/fastjoomlahosting.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-turbo/includes/wpt-core.php(5) : eval()'d code on line 21

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/excell/public_html/fastjoomlahosting.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-turbo/includes/wpt-core.php(5) : eval()'d code:21) in /home/excell/public_html/fastjoomlahosting.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-super-cache/wp-cache-phase2.php on line 76
How do you block ilivid and other malicious software from tricking the user into installing them on their sys?

How do you block ilivid and other malicious software from tricking the user into installing them on their sys?

I think ilivid is a disgusting, sorry excuse for a program if i ever saw one and that’s not even the worst of it. This company uses VIRUS- LIKE TECHNIQUES to force their software into unsuspecting web users by concealing download buttons in other websites and tricking the user into installing their POORLY WRITTEN PROGRAM. Any company that resorts to purposefully misleading the public should be stopped. What is so alarming with ilivid is that THE COMPANY IGNORES WEB USER PRIVACY, They will install their software into your machine without any regard for your safety or respect for your preferences. Are you wondering why your video thumbnails aren’t showing up anymore ?? Chances are ilivid have changed the video codecs in your machine so it is now associated with their software and since ILIVID IS INCAPABLE and poorly coded video player that it is it now has control of your video files and HAS NO IDEA WHAT TO DO WITH IT! Imagine Sarah Palin talking about foreign policy and you will get the picture. So back to my original question. Does anyone know of a way to block ilivid or make an antivirus recognize it as the DANGEROUS PEST that it is ??

Chosen Answer:

The majority of computers get infected from visiting a specially crafted webpage that exploits one or multiple software vulnerabilities. It could be by clicking a link within an email or simply browsing the net and it happens silently without any user interaction whatsoever. Vulnerabilities are flaws that exist in various programs and that allow someone to make that piece of software do something it’s not supposed to do such as downloading and running malware. Vulnerabilities exist because software is written by humans who make mistakes or simply are too lazy to put safeguards in their code.

Fortunately software gets patched from time to time as flaws are getting discovered. While one might think this should solve all our problems there are two things that make this patching process an issue:

not all software updates itself automatically (for various reasons) and people certainly “forget” (let’s give them the benefit of the doubt) to update their PC.
the bad guys use those newly discovered flaws in exploit kits (leveraging the hard work of others by simply copying and pasting what others wrote or adapting proof of concepts).

To add to this crippled patching process, there are also vulnerabilities that are discovered before any patch is available and that can be used for days before software/security companies discover them. These are called 0-day threats and although difficult to find, there are enough bright minds out there to make this a reality.

Today’s most common exploits involve:

the browser(s) (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc…)
third party browser plugins (Flash player, Adobe Reader, Java, QuickTime, VLC player, etc..)
the Operating System (Windows, Mac OS)

If we get back to our concept of vulnerabilities, it comes down to exploiting a flaw in a program by forcing specially crafted content in the form of malicious PDF, Flash, Java, font, etc.. file. That file is the intermediary between the web exploit and your computer – it sort of has a foot in and out of the door – and if successful in exploiting the software installed on your PC, it will create and run a malicious file – the final payload – which could be a banking Trojan that captures your usernames and passwords or a spam bot , a piece of malware that will send thousands of emails from your computer .

Here’s how a drive-by download attack happens:

Infected Web site. It all starts here… a legitimate site running WordPress, Joomla! or some other Content Management System. Site was set up by someone with very little knowledge about web security, paying only a few bucks a month for hosting. What could go wrong? Lots, it turns out. Websites are easy to build but yet very difficult to secure and contrary to popular belief, your web hosting company is not going to do all the work or even monitor your site for a handful of dollars per month. The bad guys love easy prey and in a few minutes they will have found insecure file permissions or a vulnerability in WordPress that should have been patched… two years ago! Among the many things one can do once a website is hacked, the bad guys love to insert malicious code in existing web pages. The goal is simple: use all the website’s traffic (people browsing that site) and try to infect their PC by sending them to an exploit kit site.

Exploit kit. The exploit kit is the bad guy’s Swiss Army knife to exploit someone’s computer. Its goals are to assess a potential victim and then deliver a payload. The assessment part is sort of a “let’s get to know who you are” type of introduction. What is your browser, are you running out of date software, etc… This only takes a couple of seconds – if that -and then the relationship goes sour.

Exploit files. The exploit kit loads files like PDF documents, Java applets, Flash media and any others that are accepted by the victim’s machine. What happens then is the actual exploitation of software vulnerabilities. Adobe Reader will open the PDF just as if it were any other PDF you can find, except it doesn’t know that this one has been crafted carefully to bypass the regular road and go awry. For example, a malicious PDF may download a remote executable and then run it with full admin privileges on the system.

Malware payload. All of the above happened for a reason, and this is it. It took a bit of work to get there (had to travel half way around the world from an infected site hosted in North America to an exploit kit in St Petersburg, Russia). But if we got here in one piece it means one thing: ‘operation exploitation’ was successful and the computer has been infected with a new piece of malware. Until that machine gets cleaned, it is in the hands of the bad guys who may now do as they wish with it.

READ MORE(IF you really want to learn)

http://blog.malwarebytes.org/intelligence/2013/01/web-exploits-bright-future/#more-525

by: Wide Glide
on: 17th January 13

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

2 Responses to “How do you block ilivid and other malicious software from tricking the user into installing them on their sys?”

  1. Colinc says:

    There is no way to prevent someone installing from careless browsing. Or from bad software sites. You can only rely on anti-spyware/virus programs, plus current browser security, to prevent the worst. But unless a program steals information or prevent you using the machine these can NOT legally block it. But it can always be uninstalled. Easy answer.

  2. Wide Glide says:

    The majority of computers get infected from visiting a specially crafted webpage that exploits one or multiple software vulnerabilities. It could be by clicking a link within an email or simply browsing the net and it happens silently without any user interaction whatsoever. Vulnerabilities are flaws that exist in various programs and that allow someone to make that piece of software do something it’s not supposed to do such as downloading and running malware. Vulnerabilities exist because software is written by humans who make mistakes or simply are too lazy to put safeguards in their code.

    Fortunately software gets patched from time to time as flaws are getting discovered. While one might think this should solve all our problems there are two things that make this patching process an issue:

    not all software updates itself automatically (for various reasons) and people certainly “forget” (let’s give them the benefit of the doubt) to update their PC.
    the bad guys use those newly discovered flaws in exploit kits (leveraging the hard work of others by simply copying and pasting what others wrote or adapting proof of concepts).

    To add to this crippled patching process, there are also vulnerabilities that are discovered before any patch is available and that can be used for days before software/security companies discover them. These are called 0-day threats and although difficult to find, there are enough bright minds out there to make this a reality.

    Today’s most common exploits involve:

    the browser(s) (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc…)
    third party browser plugins (Flash player, Adobe Reader, Java, QuickTime, VLC player, etc..)
    the Operating System (Windows, Mac OS)

    If we get back to our concept of vulnerabilities, it comes down to exploiting a flaw in a program by forcing specially crafted content in the form of malicious PDF, Flash, Java, font, etc.. file. That file is the intermediary between the web exploit and your computer – it sort of has a foot in and out of the door – and if successful in exploiting the software installed on your PC, it will create and run a malicious file – the final payload – which could be a banking Trojan that captures your usernames and passwords or a spam bot , a piece of malware that will send thousands of emails from your computer .

    Here’s how a drive-by download attack happens:

    Infected Web site. It all starts here… a legitimate site running WordPress, Joomla! or some other Content Management System. Site was set up by someone with very little knowledge about web security, paying only a few bucks a month for hosting. What could go wrong? Lots, it turns out. Websites are easy to build but yet very difficult to secure and contrary to popular belief, your web hosting company is not going to do all the work or even monitor your site for a handful of dollars per month. The bad guys love easy prey and in a few minutes they will have found insecure file permissions or a vulnerability in WordPress that should have been patched… two years ago! Among the many things one can do once a website is hacked, the bad guys love to insert malicious code in existing web pages. The goal is simple: use all the website’s traffic (people browsing that site) and try to infect their PC by sending them to an exploit kit site.

    Exploit kit. The exploit kit is the bad guy’s Swiss Army knife to exploit someone’s computer. Its goals are to assess a potential victim and then deliver a payload. The assessment part is sort of a “let’s get to know who you are” type of introduction. What is your browser, are you running out of date software, etc… This only takes a couple of seconds – if that -and then the relationship goes sour.

    Exploit files. The exploit kit loads files like PDF documents, Java applets, Flash media and any others that are accepted by the victim’s machine. What happens then is the actual exploitation of software vulnerabilities. Adobe Reader will open the PDF just as if it were any other PDF you can find, except it doesn’t know that this one has been crafted carefully to bypass the regular road and go awry. For example, a malicious PDF may download a remote executable and then run it with full admin privileges on the system.

    Malware payload. All of the above happened for a reason, and this is it. It took a bit of work to get there (had to travel half way around the world from an infected site hosted in North America to an exploit kit in St Petersburg, Russia). But if we got here in one piece it means one thing: ‘operation exploitation’ was successful and the computer has been infected with a new piece of malware. Until that machine gets cleaned, it is in the hands of the bad guys who may now do as they wish with it.

    READ MORE(IF you really want to learn)
    http://blog.malwarebytes.org/intelligence/2013/01/web-exploits-bright-future/#more-525

Leave a Reply